Integrated Plan

Student Equity

Office Hours: Monday – Friday 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
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CONTACT INFORMATION:
Dr. Susana Castellanos-Gaona

Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) & Student Equity Coordinator
scastellanos-gaona@gwc.cccd.edu
714-895-7711 ext. 55301
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Logan Shreve
Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) & Student Equity Staff Aide
lshreve@gwc.cccd.edu
714-892-7711 ext. 55306

Background

Golden West College (GWC) is one of three community colleges of the Coast Community College District located in Orange County, serving primarily the communities of Costa Mesa, Fountain Valley, Garden Grove, Huntington Beach, Newport Beach, Seal Beach, and Westminster.  Golden West College has 17,034 students with 70% of its students being 25 years of age or younger. The ethnic/racial composition of Golden West College is 30.4% Hispanic/Latinx, 31.2% White Non-Hispanic, 27.5% Asian, 4.6% Two or More Races, 2.1% African-American, 1.2% Unknown, 0.5% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, and 0.4% American Indian/Alaska Native.

The Mission of Golden West College is to create an intellectually and culturally stimulating learning environment for its diverse student population. The College provides enriching and innovative educational programs that help students meet their individual goals. The Student Equity Plan is designed to advance the college mission by analyzing and addressing each Student Equity Success Indicator based on disaggregated data representing gender, ethnicity, economic disadvantage, disability, veteran and foster youth status.

The Recruitment to Completion Committee (RCC) established a Technical Review Group (TRG) to provide input for the 2017-19 Integrated Plan.  The TRG was convened by the Student Success and Support & Student Equity Manager in May 2017.  This group included member representation from the following groups:

  • Basic Skills Initiative
  • Counseling Division
  • English Department
  • English as a Second Language Department
  • Faculty Equity Coordinator
  • Fiscal Services
  • Learning Resources
  • Mathematics Department
  • Research
  • Student Equity
  • Student Services
  • Student Success and Support Program
  • Title III

This plan was vetted through the Recruitment to Completion Committee, Academic Senate, and Planning & Budget throughout the writing process.  This process allowed members from each standing committee to provide feedback through participatory governance. The plan was reviewed twice by each committee and approved before moving forward to the Board of Trustees.  The Board of Trustees will review and consider approval of this plan on November 15, 2017.

Committee
Planning and Budget Committee
Review / Approval Date
September 27, 2017 (1st Review)
October 11, 2017 (2nd Review and Approval)

Committee
Academic Senate
Review / Approval Date
September 26, 2017 (1st Review)
October 10, 2017 (2nd Review and Approval)

Committee
Recruitment to Completion Committee
Review / Approval Date
September 26, 2017 (1st Review)
October 10, 2017 (2nd Review and Approval)


Student Equity Goals and Progress:

The following student equity goals were identified in 2014-15 based on disaggregated data using the Point Gap Analysis method.  Progress for each goal has been summarized and continued 2017-19 activities and interventions have been identified:

2014-15 Goals
Close 4.7% Pts. Access Gap for Veteran Students by 2018-19 (Equity)
Progress
Several services have been implemented for Veterans as part of the Veterans Resource Center (VRC). Veterans now have access to direct counseling services through SSSP funds. Beginning Fall 2017, a counselor specializing in academic advising for Veterans is available inside the VRC for 10 hours per week. Equity funds have been made available to provide Veterans with specialized orientation services known as Vets-at-Ease. The goal is to provide Veterans with resource information in order to have access to services and maintain retention and persistence from semester to semester. In order to increase access to technology, the Chromebook Loan Program provides Veterans with the opportunity to checkout a Chromebook for the semester. In addition, the VRC is in the process of creating a small computer lab space with a networked printer in order for Veterans to have access to technology during their visit. The access gap for Veterans in 2014-15 was 4.7 percentage points when compared to 6.4% of adult population within the community served between the ages of 18-64. The population of GWC students who are Veterans remains at 1.7%; however, as of Fall 2016, the percentage of Veterans in the adult population within the community served has decreased to 5.8% thus reducing the gap to 4.1 percentage points

Veterans Student Population Chart Vets closing the gap2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Vets-At-Ease Orientations
• Equity Research
• PUENTE Outreach
• EOPS Foster Youth Outreach
• Rustler Welcome Day
• DSPS Orientations
• Leading From the Middle Academy
• Professional Development
• Financial Aid Outreach
• Textbook Cost Reduction Program


2014-15 Goals
Close Course Completion Gap for Hispanic/Latinx (5% Pts.), Economically Disadvantaged (1% Pts.), and African-American (15% Pts.) Students by 2018-19 (Equity)
Progress
Several interventions have been implemented for different DI groups using equity funds. The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) is in full operation, serving student-athletes with tutoring services, academic coach mentors, and access to technology via a computer lab and through the Chromebook Loan Program. The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) engages students with 40-60 hours of direct support per week and direct one-to-one contact. Providing equitable access to study skills and life skills increases the opportunity for social mobility. The success of SASC can best be illustrated by the growth of the program in the 2 years it has been running. Additional services have been added as the number of student-athletes served has increased from 62 to 350 for the academic year. The usage of SASC has doubled in a year with a 14% increase in student-athletes earning a 3.0 or higher GPA from Fall 2016 to Fall 2017. In addition, several of our student athletes have received scholarships at the GWC Scholarship Awards Celebration.

Tutoring for developmental Math started Fall 2016. Mentors for at risk student-athletes were hired in January and are currently working with over 40 high-risk students. An Academic Counselor, specifically trained to work with the needs of student-athletes, now has walk-in hours scheduled in the center. The overall success rate for SASC student athlete participants was 72.2% for Spring 2016 versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. In Fall 2016, we saw similar success rates with 71.2% for SASC student athlete participants versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. To address economically disadvantaged students, financial aid conducts outreach and in-reach services to inform and assist with FAFSA applications. These services were expanded to include information and application assistance for students under Dreamers and DACA. Services have been augmented for PUENTE students including the implementation of a mentorship program, family orientations, specialized PUENTE counseling, access to technology via the Chromebook Loan Program and access to northern California CSU and UC campus tours. Case management and outreach is currently in place to increase program participation as well as retention, persistence, and completion. PUENTE has shown increased success rates for student participants. The success rates range from 25% to 45% higher than students not participating in the program. The overall GPA is nine points higher than non-participants at 2.66. A faculty team is engaged in inquiry with coaching services stemming from the partnership with the University of Southern California – Center for Urban Education (USC-CUE). Faculty focused inquiry efforts in chemistry courses to attempt to close achievement gaps and increase participation from DI groups. Inquiry efforts resulted in the implementation of surveys including a Mindset quiz and student impressions stemming from the first day of class. In addition, faculty reviewed and edited syllabi through the lens of equity and conducted classroom observations to assess the classroom environment. The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 5 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 62% when compared to the average completion rate of 67%. The goal was to close the gap by 5 percentage points by 2018-19. The gap has been closed by 1 percentage point with a success rate increase to 63%.

Completion rate- Hispanic-Latinx

Closing the Gap- Hispanic-Latinx

The gap for Economically Disadvantaged students in 2014-15 was 1 percentage point.  The completion rate for this population was at 66% when compared to the average completion rate of 67%.  The goal was to close the gap by 1 percentage point by 2018-19.  The gap has been closed by 1 percentage point with a success rate increase to 67%. 2017-19 Activities/Interventions

Completion rate- Hispanic-Latinx chart 2

Closing gap- Hispanic-Latinx-chart 2The gap for African/American students in 2014-15 was 15 percentage points.  The completion rate for this population was at 52% when compared to the average completion rate of 67%.  The goal was to close the gap by 5 percentage points by 2018-19.  The gap was increased by 2 percentage points with a success rate decrease to 50%; however, the overall completion rate has increased to 68%.

Completion rate- Hispanic-Latinx Chart 3 closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 3

2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC)
• STEM Counseling
• PUENTE Counseling
• PUENTE Mentorship
• Financial Aid Outreach
• Cultural Connections
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Textbook Reduction Cost Program
• Oohlala Platform
• Cranium Café
• College Scheduler
• Civitas
• PUENTE Coordination
• Equity Research


2014-15 Goals
Close basic skills English course completion gap for Hispanic/Latinx (7% Pts.), White Non-Hispanic (3% Pts.), and not economically disadvantaged students (11% Pts.) students by 2021-22 (Equity)
Progress
The course English G090 leads into a transfer-level English course. Another option is for students who are classified as “below transfer” level to enroll in a transfer level course with a concurrent support lab (English G095). The aforementioned option saves students a semester of remediation and also improves the chances of them completing college level English. Nationally, Black and Hispanic students are twice as likely as whites to have to take three or more remedial courses, so these classes directly impact and help these groups. The co-requisite model, in particular, is successful in closing equity gaps. The English Department is integrating counseling services into the English G099 course sections to improve retention and student support. Such integration will include counseling presentations and classroom assignments related to basic skills instruction. The aim is that the early intervention will help academically challenged students through the counseling or other support services. The Peer Assisted Study Sessions Program (PASS), based on the University of Missouri model of supplemental instruction, has been implemented at GWC for three years. Though at first implementation the results were mixed, and it appeared to be a differential affect in English, today the PASS Program continues to be influential as support for instruction and student success. Specifically, the Fall 2016 data indicates the following: 66% passing rate for students who attended PASS sessions, as opposed to 31% who did not (English G098). For English G099, 67% of PASS attendees succeeded, as opposed of 25% who did not. The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) is in full operation serving student-athletes with tutoring services, academic coach mentors, and access to technology via a computer lab and through the Chromebook Loan Program. The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) engages students with 40-60 hours of direct support per week and direct one-to-one contact. Providing equitable access to study skills and life skills increases the opportunity for social mobility. The success of SASC can best be illustrated by the growth of the program in the 2 years it has been running. Additional services have been added as the number of student-athletes served has increased from 62 to 350 for the academic year. The usage of SASC has doubled in a year with a 14% increase in student-athletes earning a 3.0 or higher GPA from Fall 2016 to Fall 2017. In addition, several of our student athletes have received scholarships at the GWC Scholarship Awards Celebration. Tutoring for developmental Math started in Fall 2016. Mentors for student-athletes were hired in January and are currently working with over 40 students. An Academic Counselor, specifically trained to work with the needs of student-athletes, now has walk-in hours in the center. The overall success rate for SASC student athlete participants for Spring 2016 was 72.2% versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. In Fall 2016, the success rates were similar, with 71.2% for SASC student athlete participants versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. In addition to these interventions, professional development opportunities are offered to all campus employees via conferences and webinars offered by Innovative Educators. The gap for Not Economically Disadvantaged students in 2014-15 was 11 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 31% when compared to the average completion rate of 42%. The goal was to close the gap by 6 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 7 percentage points with a success rate increase to 38%.

English - Completion rate- Hispanic-Latinx Chart 4

English-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 4

The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 7 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 35% when compared to the average completion rate of 42%. The goal was to close the gap by 2 percentage points by 2021-22. The current course success rate for Hispanic/Latinx students remains at 35%; however, the overall success rate has increased to 68% thus decreasing the gap for this population to 6 percentage points.

English-Completion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 5English-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 5

The gap for White Non-Hispanic in 2014-15 was 3 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 39% when compared to the average completion rate of 42%. The goal was to close the gap by 3 percentage points by 2021-22. The current course success rate for White students remains at 39%; however, the overall success rate has increased to 68%.

English-Completion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 6

English-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 6

2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC)
• PUENTE Counseling
• PUENTE Mentorship
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Textbook Cost Reduction Program
• Civitas • Equity Research


2014-15 Goals
Close basic skills math course completion gap for Hispanic/Latinx (3% Pts.), White Non-Hispanic (3% Pts.), and not economically disadvantaged (5% Pts.) students by 2021-22 (Equity)
Progress
The Peer Assisted Study Sessions Program (PASS), based on the University of Missouri model of supplemental instruction, has been implemented at GWC for three years. Though at first implementation the results were mixed, and it appeared to be a differential effect for mathematics, today the PASS Program continues to be influential as support for instruction and student success. Specifically, the Fall 2016 data indicates the following: in mathematics, 52% for Math G010 and 58% of the PASS attendees, respectively, succeeded. On the other hand, 48% and 42% of those who did not participate in PASS did not succeed (Math G010 and Math G030, Craig and Bergman, 2017). The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) is in full operation serving student-athletes with tutoring services, academic coach mentors, and access to technology via a computer lab and through the Chromebook Loan Program. The Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC) engages students with 40-60 hours of direct support per week and direct one-to-one contact. Providing equitable access to study skills and life skills increases the opportunity for social mobility. The success of SASC can best be illustrated by the growth of the program in the 2 years it has been running. Additional services have been added as the number of student-athletes served has increased from 62 to 350 for the academic year. The usage of SASC has doubled in a year with a 14% increase in student-athletes earning a 3.0 GPA or higher from Fall 2016 to Fall 2017. In addition, several of our student athletes have received scholarships at the GWC Scholarship Awards Celebration. Tutoring for developmental Math was started Fall 2016. Mentors for student-athletes were hired in January and are currently working with over 40 underprepared students. An Academic Counselor, specifically trained to work with the needs of student-athletes, now has walk-in hours within the center. The overall success rate for SASC student-athlete participants was for Spring 2016 72.2% versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. In Fall 2016, the success rates were similar, with 71.2% for SASC student athlete participants versus 69.8% for all other GWC students. Professional development opportunities are offered to all campus employees via conferences and webinars offered by Innovative Educators. The gap for Not Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15 was 5 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 17% when compared to the average completion rate of 22%. The goal was to close the gap by 5 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 3% with a success rate increase to 20%.

Math-Completion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 7 Math-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 7

The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 3 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 19% when compared to the average completion rate of 22%. The goal was to close the gap by 3 percentage points by 2021-22. The current course completion rate for Hispanic/Latinx students remains at 19%.

Math-Completion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 8 Math-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 8

The gap for White Non-Hispanic students in 2014-15 was 2 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 20% when compared to the average completion rate of 22%. The goal was to close the gap by 2 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 2 percentage points with a success rate increase to 22%.

Math-Completion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 9 Math-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 9


2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC)
• PUENTE Counseling
• PUENTE Mentorship
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Textbook Cost Reduction Program
• Civitas • Equity Research


2014-15 Goals
Close ESL basic skills completion for Hispanic/Latinx (6 Pts.) and not economically disadvantaged (2 Pts.) students by 2021-22 (Equity)
Progress
Efforts in curriculum inquiry continue to determine pathway alignment. This resulted in the redesign of the first two levels of ESL as non-credit courses. The ESL department is currently completing a self-program evaluation process. In addition, our institution will be collaborating with other California community colleges and partner with IEPI to create and participate in Partnership Resource Teams (PRT). The gap for Not Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15 was 2 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 20% when compared to the average completion rate of 22%. The goal was to close the gap by 2 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 2 percentage points with a success rate increase to 22%.
ESLCompletion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 10 ESL-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 10The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 11 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 11% when compared to the average completion rate of 22%. The goal was to close the gap by 5 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 7 percentage points with a success rate increase to 18%.

ESLCompletion-rate-Hispanic-Latinx Chart 11 ESL-closing Hispanic-Latinx- chart 11

2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC)
• PUENTE Counseling
• PUENTE Mentorship
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Textbook Cost Reduction Program
• Civitas
• Equity Research


2014-15 Goals
Close degree and certificate completion gap for Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (10 Pts.), Hispanic/Latinx (1 Pt.), and not economically disadvantaged (2% Pts.) students by 2021-22 (Equity)
Progress
Efforts continue through the Graduation Completion project funded under equity. A case manager continues to evaluate transcripts for students that have completed or are close to completion of a degree and/or certificate. Students are contacted and provided assistance in completing the required documentation to award the degree and/or certificate and assistance in completing registration for courses needed for completion. Professional development opportunities are offered to all campus employees via conferences and webinars offered by Innovative Educators. The gap for Not Economically Disadvantaged students in 2014-15 was 2 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 21% when compared to the average completion rate of 23%. The goal was to close the gap by 2 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 4 percentage points with a success rate increase to 25%

Completion-rate-Hawaiian-Pacific Chart 12 Closing Hawaiian-Pacific-chart 12The gap for Hawaiian/Pacific Islander students in 2014-15 was 15 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 8% when compared to the average completion rate of 23%. The goal was to close the gap by 10 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 9 percentage points with a success rate increase to 17%.

https://i1.wp.com/www.goldenwestcollege.edu/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Completion-rate-Hawaiian-Pacific-Chart-13.png?resize=359%2C126 Closing Hawaiian-Pacific-chart 13The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 1 percentage point. The completion rate for this population was at 22% when compared to the average completion rate of 23%. The goal was to close the gap by 1 percentage point by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 4 percentage points with a success rate increase to 26%.

Completion-rate-Hawaiian-Pacific Chart 14 Closing Hawaiian-Pacific-chart 14
2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Student-Athlete Success Center (SASC)
• STEM Counseling
• PUENTE Counseling
• Career/Transfer Counseling
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Textbook Cost Reduction Program
• Graduation Completion
• Civitas
• College Scheduler
• Cranium Café
• Equity Research


2014-15 Goals
Close transfer gaps for White Non-Hispanic (4 Pts.), Hispanic/Latinx (5 Pts.), and not economically disadvantaged (4 Pts.) students by 2021-22 (Equity)
Progress
GWC’s Curriculum Committee approved an open entry English course G090 that combines two levels of remediation and leads into a transfer-level English course. The English Department offered three sections of this class in Fall 2017 and will offer three sections in Spring 2018. The Curriculum Committee also approved the co-requisite course, G095, which allows students, who placed below transfer level, to enroll in transfer level English 100 with concurrent lab support. The English Department offered two sections of this class in Fall 2017 and plans to scale up to three sections in Spring 2018. Both courses have been well received by students. Students enrolled in these courses reflect campus diversity. The hope is that these courses support timely graduation by providing first time students the opportunity to complete accelerated courses. Collaboration has begun between the high schools and the English Department. A series of regular high school and college faculty collaboration workshops is scheduled, beginning in October 2017. Under the leadership of the Basic Skills Initiative English Coordinator, English workshops are being developed to aid Latino high school males to transition into college level English courses. GWC is following the findings of The Pew Research Center’s study that has shown that 50 percent of Hispanics cite “poor English skills” as a deterrent to finishing high school or going to college. Services have been augmented for PUENTE students including the implementation of a mentorship program, family orientations, specialized PUENTE counseling, access to technology via the Chromebook Loan Program and access northern California CSU and UC campus tours. Case management and outreach is also in motion to increase program participation as well as retention, persistence, and completion. PUENTE has shown increased success rates for student participants. The success rates range from 25% to 45% higher than students not participating in the program. The overall GPA is nine points higher than non-participants at 2.66. Transfer Counseling and Coordination is fully operational. Transfer admission has become more complex and challenging for students. Designated counseling hours in the Transfer Center has allowed for increased counseling and checking of degree requirements for CSU ADT verification. In August 2016, Express counseling saw a total of 432 students for Spring admissions, which is a 68% increase over 2015 totals. Increased coordination has led to additional programming, advertising, and outreach to students resulting in increased transfer application workshop attendance, transcript evaluation for application submission, and student admissions. Overall student attendance in center activities has increased from 3,556 in 2015 to 4,219 in 2016 (a 19% increase). Full-time Foster Youth outreach and in-reach is fully operational. The program is designed and dedicated to the delivery of comprehensive services and benefits that encourage the enrollment, retention, and transfer of students who face language, social, economic, and educational disadvantages. Enrollment for Foster Youth in Fall 2016 began with 427 returning and new students. In addition to on- and off-campus outreach activities, staff conducted classroom presentations during the Fall 2016 semester and as a result, enrollment increased by 85.9% to 794 students. As of the beginning of the Spring 2017 semester, the program reached 824 students and continues to grow. Professional development opportunities are offered to all campus employees via conferences and webinars offered by Innovative Educators. The gap for Not Economically Disadvantaged in 2014-15 was 4 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 37% when compared to the average completion rate of 41%. The goal was to close the gap by 4 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 7 percentage points with a success rate increase to 44%.

Completion-rate-White Non-Hispanic Chart 15

Closing White Non-Hispanic -chart 15

The gap for White Non-Hispanic in 2014-15 was 4 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 37% when compared to the average completion rate of 41%. The goal was to close the gap by 4 percentage points by 2018-19. The gap was increased by 4 percentage points with a success rate decrease to 33%; however, the overall completion rate has increased to 44%.

Completion-rate-White Non-Hispanic Chart 16 Closing White Non-Hispanic -chart 16The gap for Hispanic/Latinx students in 2014-15 was 6 percentage points. The completion rate for this population was at 35% when compared to the average completion rate of 41%. The goal was to close the gap by 5 percentage points by 2021-22. The gap was closed by 2 percentage points with a success rate increase to 37%.

Completion-rate-White Non-Hispanic Chart 17 Closing White Non-Hispanic -chart 17
2017-19 Activities/Interventions
• Graduation Completion
• PUENTE Northern California Trip
• PUENTE Counseling
• USC-CUE Partnership
• Professional Development
• Career/Transfer Counseling


2017-18 Student Equity Allocation

Academic/Classified Salaries and Benefits – $662,188.00
Supplies and Materials – $70,433.00
Other Operating Expenses and Services – $269,579.00
TOTAL Allocation – $1,002,200.00


Point of Contact:

Dr. Claudia Lee
Vice President of Student Services
clee@gwc.cccd.edu
714-892-7711 ext. 55305

Dr. Susana Castellanos-Gaona
Student Success and Support Program (SSSP) & Student Equity Manager
scastellanos-gaona@gwc.cccd.edu
714-895-7711 ext. 55301